Archive for the Development Category

PyGLy steps into the future

Posted in Development, PyGLy, Twisted Pair with tags , , , , , on 2012/09/21 by Adam Griffiths

I’ve been working quite heavily on PyGLy for the last few weeks and I’m incredibly pleased to announce that PyGLy is now OpenGL 3 clean!

It took more work than I hoped. Not because of PyGLy (it was already pretty good), but Pyglet’s OpenGL Core (3+) support on OS-X, is well… broken.
I had to integrate a patch written by someone else and patch out 2 of the window event handlers.
The main reason for this is that OpenGL Core on OS-X is limited to 3.2, and is Core only (no legacy compatibility).
These changes can be found in my Github repository.

Pyglet isn’t without it’s problems. It is quite heavy weight in places. There is no support for float or 1D textures.
Other problems are it’s usage of legacy calls. These are scattered throughout the code base and prevent me from using even the Label or VertexList classes.
I would LOVE to help with the development of Pyglet… but I find the code… very confusing.
It’s got a fair amount of abstraction. Tracing even a vertex buffer blows my mind.

Regardless, I hope these issues will be fixed soon.

PyGLy Progress

Posted in Development, Twisted Pair with tags , , , on 2012/07/06 by Adam Griffiths

Work on PyGLy is progressing well. The code is better designed and cleaner than I’d hoped, so I’m very pleased.

I’m wanting to keep PyGLy thin, so not much more new functionality will be added. New features will go into higher level projects that sit on top.

I tried some NumPy optimisations with BLAS and other libs, but haven’t seen much improvement. Biggest change was running Python with ‘-O’, which got me another 10 FPS.

Dev continues!

Getting Cocos 1.x / Kobold2D to work with the latest CocosBuilder

Posted in Development, How To, Programming, Rant with tags , , , , , on 2012/03/30 by Adam Griffiths

CocosBuilder is a brilliant tool that helps you rapidly develop Cocos2D applications.

But the latest versions require the Cocos 2.x branch.

Some of us are stuck with Cocos 1.x for the time being. So let’s figure out how to get things going.

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Initial release of PyGLy

Posted in Development, Programming, Twisted Pair with tags , , , , on 2012/03/07 by Adam Griffiths

It’s a pretty big day for us, as I’m pushing my labor of love, PyGLy, to GitHub.

PyGLy is a 3D framework developed in pure python.

I’ve been dismayed at the state of game frameworks on Python.

There are a large number of quality 3D engines and frameworks out there. However, there are serious problems with the ‘engines’ out there that have Python bindings.

  • Not truly cross-platform (this is Python FFS!).
  • Not free.
  • Not maintained.
  • No documentation (the worst culprit).
  • Bindings are 2nd class citizens and you still need to code C/C++/Whatever.
  • Don’t work with latest versions of code.

Most engines have bindings created by the community. The problem is these are quickly dumped when the person moves on.

Python only 3D engines seem… well… stagnant.

  • PySoya and PySoy seem to be seething at each other but not really producing much.
  • PyGame is just SDL in disguise.
  • The rest… well they all 404 now.

For the most part, 3D game development on Python is dead.

So, behind the scenes, I’ve been writing my own 3D framework for Python, PyGLy.

“Framework” is an important word there. PyGLy does not force any one methodology on you. PyGLy simply provides functionality to wrap common functionality. Windows, Viewports, Scene Graph Nodes, Cameras. It’s up to you to put them together how you want.

Obviously some things are going to be coupled together. But for the most part, PyGLy just gets out of the way.

At the moment PyGLy is quite small, but it is in active development and already has features that may interest some.

I think the best case for it at the moment is for people wanting to rapidly prototype in 3D but not be abstracted from the rendering process. PyGLy lets you forget about the scene graph and just concentrate on rendering your objects. Rendering is performed via callbacks. You can make any OpenGL call you want in these callbacks.

PyGLy is the foundation of our Python 3D work, so expect it to be actively developed going forward.

The following are some of the things that we’re wanting to add in the future:

  • Shadowing.
  • Scene management (Octree, etc).
  • Cocos2D integration (CCLayer).
  • Separate OpenGL 3+ path.

As we’ve said before, Twisted Pair are true believers of Open Source, so you can find PyGLy on our GitHub repository under a very liberal license.

Animation support for CCTMXTiledMap

Posted in Development, Programming with tags , , , , , on 2012/03/07 by Adam Griffiths

I spent today learning Objective-C and working on a small module for one of our up and coming projects.

The outcome of this was CCAnimatedTMXTiledMap. A class that adds animation support to CCTMXTiledMap in Cocos2D-iphone / Kobold2D.

Twisted Pair are true believers in support Open Source and as such we’ve published the source code to our Github repository.

Python weak references to Methods and Functions

Posted in Development, How To, Programming with tags , , on 2012/03/01 by Adam Griffiths

The ‘weakref’ module in Python cannot store pointers to methods (there are exceptions but basically you can’t).

The following is a module I’ve written to bypass this. It is essentially code from the following sites, but improved by myself for storing them in containers like set([]).

References:
[1] [2]

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Installing Pyglet in Mac OS X

Posted in Development, Platforms, Programming with tags , , , , , on 2012/02/21 by Adam Griffiths

Pyglet is a common requirement for many Python applications, a major one being Cocos2D.

But it doesn’t work out of the box. Running a Pyglet application will result in the following error:

OSError: dlopen(/System/Library/Frameworks/QuickTime.framework/QuickTime, 6): no suitable image found.  Did find:

/System/Library/Frameworks/QuickTime.framework/QuickTime: mach-o, but wrong architecture

/System/Library/Frameworks/QuickTime.framework/QuickTime: mach-o, but wrong architecture

The following are the steps to take to get Pyglet and PyObjc installed on OS-X (tested with 10.7 Lion).

Pyglet 1.1 uses the Carbon framework, but this is not compatible with 64-bit Python installs. The Pyglet 1.2 branch has been modified to use Quartz, but no releases of this branch have seen the light of day (sigh). We must instead install Pyglet from the Mercurial repository.

The Quartz bindings require the use of PyObjc but the latest versions do not work with Pip. The patches to PyObjc’s setup.py that I’ve seen on the internet do not work for me. The following is the only method I’ve had work.

Remove any existing Pyglet install

pip uninstall pyglet

Install Pyglet from the repository

pip install hg+https://pyglet.googlecode.com/hg/

Edit: The following is no longer needed

We need to install PyObjc for the new Pyglet Quartz API. But PyObjc is horribly broken and the latest version does not install with Pip or easy_install.

We must instead install an older version.

pip install pyobjc==2.2

You should now have a working Pyglet installation.

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